Blog posts tagged "del.icio.us"

When I say “FUD” …

October 22nd, 2009

"Flicker upcoming"? WTF? :)

… I mean Flickr/Upcoming/Delicious. In particular, I mean that brief moment of optimism in the Spring of ’06, on the roof of the Iron Cactus, at the Spread the FUD party, when it looked like Yahoo! had a wedge and the will to solve the social search problem, and magically, I might even get to be a part of that. I said in my cover letter (in silly flowery, cover letter speak)

“The next round of innovation will be about building connections. The explosion of voices, information and ideas is currently outpacing our techniques for coping with them. We need to be helping people and communities find new ways to connect, interact, and work together to make sense of this accelerating decentralization. Innovation has been blossoming at the edges of the Net since the beginning, but innovation is also moving back to the connecting nodes, like Yahoo.”

Which is much on my mind when I hear about Marissa demo’ing social search yesterday.

And I’m deeply puzzled (and not a little disappointed) that anyone would care if Bing or Google can search the public status timelines, if it doesn’t come with social context.

Now the question is can Goog shake their historied failure at all things social.

Photo from Jan Brašna

Sharing from within Google Reader

January 4th, 2008

Collapsing the GTalk buddy list, and Reader sharing list was a serious blunder, and one that could use a bit more ink spilled about it. But one click sharing is one of my favorite Reader features.

GData Won’t Save You

Except there is a bit of a problem. I don’t really want to share with other Google Reader users, I’m not even sure I’m destined to be a long time Reader user. I want to share links the way I’m already doing it, through del.icio.us.

No problem, Reader has an Atom feed of shared items. A really good feed, with the source info maintained, well formed, nicely done. Simplest thing in the world to parse the feed, and write the entries back to del.icio.us. And I can tag any post in Reader, which is perfect, easy Ajaxy sharing into del.icio.us with a few minutes work.

Except for reasons I can’t fathom Reader isn’t including my tags in the Shared Items feed. Which all of a sudden makes my data feel a bit more locked up and trapped then I’d really like.

For Our Sins

Casting around a bit for a solution, I noticed the “Email” button, which allows me to send a link via email, along with a short note, and so “Email to del.icio.us” was born.

Super quick and dirty Perl script that:

  1. Parse the Google Reader HTML email for the relevant URL (no semantic markup, alas)
  2. Pull the del.icio.us link description from the subject
  3. Look for a line beginning “tags: ” followed by a space separated list of tags.
  4. Look for a line beginning “note: ” for the extended description.

Add the following rule to /etc/aliases file, and away you go.

to_del: | /home/you/email_to_del.pl

Takes 10-15 seconds vs 1 second to share, but much more flexible.

And Perl is still unbeatable when it comes to these kind of scripts.

Del.icio.us “Your Network”. Initial Impression.

April 28th, 2006

Presumably the new del.icio.us feature “Your Network” is just the start of a roll out as it falls a bit short of the hope and promise from Joshua’s talk at Berkman last year.

Two most critical missing features * tags from my network (otherwise I just have a new link stream to drown in) * what did my network think of this link? (as an API!)

Also I want multiple networks. * if the brilliance of del.icio.us is it allows me to simply express the various vectors of my interest, shouldn’t my interest in having someone in my network (which is opaque, and 1-directional, and definitionally about interest, not squishy social stuff) have as rich an expressive language?

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Suppressed, an alternative to Private

February 12th, 2006

The “public by default” nature of blogging, Flickr, and del.icio.us has been key to their success where earlier attempts have failed. Still there is a huge amount of info out there that is sensitive. In particular there is a large swathe of it which is time sensitive: research for a present or a presentation, research for a new product or a new job, information which gives away too much information about current intentions or physical location or security vulnerabilities, .

In fact I would argue that there is a significant overlap between the information we’re not yet ready to share, and our best, most in-depth research. The information we’re most likely to make private is the information that would most likely be useful to others.

Opaque, for a little while

So what’s an alternative to making the information private? Suppressing it; push the information down below the transparency level, and let it bob back to the surface at a later date. In 6 months the birthday will be a distant memory and the issue of a present a done deal, your Web2.0 startup will have already launched and been acquired, and so on.

Right now the public/private spectrum is 2-dimensional, if we take the time to build, maintain, and garden our social networks then we can add a dimension of public for friends/family/colleagues, but currently that requires serious investment. Time is a simpler dimension (it progresses largely without intervention), and yet adds a great deal of flexibility.

A Couple of Refinements

Re-suppression. Once information has been made public on the Web, it’s nearly impossible to remove it again. So systems with suppression need to be proactive about notifying before information slip into the public, and giving you the option to push it down for another 6 months.

Variable translucency. Once the rubber ducky of secret information has been pushed down, it might not be seen again until the privacy window expires, but it is also possible that as it gradually bobs it’s way back to the surface it will become start to become visible through the translucent bath water, gradually revealing more over time.

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Tag Stalking

December 26th, 2005

Some tags I check when trying to figure out who someone is/what their story is: me, friends, work, home, weather, craigslist. Also a quick visual scan for place names.

Even folks who’ve managed to stay fairly anonymous leak a lot of info in their tags.

Offline

December 20th, 2005

Was very unsettling to get back from a weekend of being largely offline last night to find both del.icio.us and Bloglines down. I had to read a book and go to bed.

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Yahoo and del.icio.us: A bit of speculation

December 12th, 2005

So the Yahoo acquisition of del.icio.us hit every tech blog on the planet this weekend, and hardly needs more rehashing. But a couple of ideas I haven’t seen elsewhere from one of my mailing lists.

It was pointed out that

[Yahoo] recently hired all the IBM people that worked at the WebFountain project.

And that the del.icio.us database of tagged website would be an awfully juicy source of data to start analyzing. Yahoo is the obvious player to build post-search interfaces, browsable and discoverable like Yahoo of old, but this time built to Web-scale.

Meanwhile is anyone watching the Flock’s future? What with its APIs to Yahoo’s Flickr, Yahoo’s del.icio.us, and integrated editor for all those new MT blogs. Just a thought.

Automatic Unsubscribe Considered Harmful

November 1st, 2005

I’ve see a couple of tools recently adding automatic unsubscribe features, options to unsubscribe from a feed which has gone silent for too many days or weeks.

This seems 100% wrong to me. Almost a betrayal of the bright and shiny promise of RSS.

As a Blogger

Part of what makes blogging a sustainable medium for personal publishing is I don’t have to publish every day, every week, or every month. I’m secure in the knowledge that when I do publish, my audience will still be there.

A TV station can’t do this, a newspaper can’t do this, and so they’re forced into a professionalization of media creation which is by and large unsustainable. (hence the poor quality of the evening news, wouldn’t it be nice if they only put out a report when they actually had some news to report on?)

As a Subscriber

I subscribe to a number of feeds that are only updated when something goes wrong. My server goes down, my page stops validating, there is an emergency weather alert. I need the confidence to subscribe, and then forget about these feeds secure in the knowledge that they’ll still be there when needed. (otherwise I’ll have nagging doubts, and might as well just check a website daily, this is what GTD is all about as I understand it, the confidence to forget)

As a Developer

I don’t get the motivation. A dormant feed is nearly zero cost. It isn’t changing so conditional GETs reduce the cost to the aggregator and the provider. It isn’t updating, so there is no cognitive cost to the reader. I don’t get the motivation.

Please if a feed goes long term 404, 410, 500, etc, sure unsubscribe, rather then pounding them forever. But a feed simply gone quiet? That would be a shame.

Wrong Problem

The real problem is some way to automatically detect feeds which are no longer interesting. And even then I usually hold on against the day they’ll swerve back to what I started reading them for. (usually I enjoy the detours, but sometimes…) One of the beauties of del.icio.us is it explicitly allows people to be multi-facetted, and I think our aggregator tools need to start being more aware of this.

caveat, I haven’t actually used FeedDemon’s feature (not being a Windows user), it merely reminded me of this worrying, dare I call it wrong headed, trend.

Del.icio.us Actually Getting Social

October 26th, 2005

It is interesting to sit on a blog post for 3 weeks, and see how well they age. Most age very badly, but some age badly for excellent reasons, i.e. the world changes. (politics are a great example of this right now, but that isn’t what I’ll be talking about)

Digital Lifestyle Aggregation: Using My Friends

I’ve had this persistent idea, nagging me, that somehow I should be able to use my Flickr contacts to filter the overwhelming amount of data that gets pushed at me, with the small idea being if I had a way to capture the del.icio.us accounts of all my various contacts, then I could at least build a smarter del inbox. I had started to sketch out a tool (I was thinking ning) called “theyisthey” to keep track of relationships I know between people’s various identities. (43people subscriptions are one step in this direction, and certainly an indication of how social software can be used for purposes more interesting them high score lists.)

Hear the Good News

Well we showed up en masse (Brian, Ben, Eric Hopp, Jared, Mako, Seth and I) to the Joshua’s Berkman lunch yesterday, and the most explosively interesting thing I thought he said (beyond some numbers which Brian wrote down) was that “networks” are in the works. A replacement for del’s broken inbox metaphor, networks are 1-way, opaque social networks that you can build to not only filter content, but also enhance it. (e.g. when tagging a link, see the tags and notes from everyone in your network who has also tagged this link, or install the Firefox plugin to see your networks notes on webpages in the wild)

Very cool.

(also count it, 5 Hampshire alumns in the house, we offered to make Seth an honoray Hampshire alumn, but he turned us down)